WHP

HELP! I got cut off of Medicaid!

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ASK: Why did I get cut off Medicaid?

Remember that you can get cut off of Medicaid because your income has risen, because the number of dependents has changed, or because you didn’t fill out an annual renewal (redetermination) form.

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So first, figure out whether the cancellation was correct.

Should Medicaid Have Been Cancelled?

Let’s take a few examples:

  1. You failed to fill out an annual redetermination form, but nothing else in your life has changed. Medicaid is renewed annually, and sometimes people in a household are on different cycles, so you may need to fill out renewals more than once a year. If nothing has changed, you should still be eligible for Medicaid, and should reapply at MI Bridges.

  2. Your income and/or household size has changed. Even a small increase in hours or pay/hour (minimum wage is going up!) can make a big difference. Especially if there are multiple earners in a household, things can get complicated. Here’s how to figure out if your income is still eligible. Income limits for Medicaid.

    Your household size also may have changed. Perhaps a child has grown up and is now on their own; perhaps you got a divorce; perhaps someone in your family died; perhaps parents or grandparents have moved into your household. While you are looking at income, don’t forget to look at household size.

    Remember that eligibility is a combination of both household size and income. If you feel the determination was made incorrectly, you can reapply, or file a hearing (Part 1 and Part 2).

But What If the Determination Was Correct, And You’re Not Eligible For Medicaid?

Good News: You Qualify for a Special Enrollment Period

Employer Insurance

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If your employer offers affordable health insurance, you generally are required to enroll. When your Medicaid ends, it opens a Special Enrollment Period for you to enroll in your employer health care.

It could be that the employer insurance is offered to someone else in the household, but you are eligible. With a Medicaid denial letter, you can get on their employer insurance with a Special Enrollment Period.

For an employer special enrollment period, you only have 30 days to take advantage of the offer, so don’t delay!

Marketplace (Healthcare.gov)

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If your employer does not offer you insurance, you can apply on the Marketplace (healthcare.gov), and you will likely qualify for good tax credits. [If you don’t, please give us a call. You may have fallen into a “family glitch” or answered a question incorrectly.]

For the Marketplace, you have 60 days from the day your insurance ends for the special enrollment period. You will need to prove that you have lost your Medicaid insurance with a denial letter.

 

Questions? We Help People.

Call us at 734-544-3030

Walk in to our office at 555 Towner in Ypsilanti,

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

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WHP Staff Profile: Tonya South Peterson

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Tonya South Peterson is celebrating 20 years as a county employee.  For the last two years, Tonya has been an enrollment specialist at the Washtenaw Health Plan.  Tonya started her career after being noticed by a former nursing director.  Tonya worked at a photography lab where the director had her photos developed and noticed the excellent customer service Tonya provided.  After seeing her interact with a particularly difficult customer, the director mentioned a job opening in the Maternal Infant Health Program and the rest is history!  Tonya spent two and a half years as a Maternal Infant Health Advocate before moving to Women, Infants and Children (WIC) to become an eligibility and enrollment specialist for 15 years.  

Tonya loves working with children and families.  Her work at Washtenaw County Health Department gives her a "great sense of satisfaction in helping others."  At WIC, she got to know many families and is always happy to see them at the WHP office.  Through her years at WIC, Tonya had many roles in addition to enrollment and eligibility but enjoyed the families and children the most.  At WHP, Tonya enjoys helping clients with their healthcare and many other issues.  Tonya expertly assists people with utility assistance through the state assistance programs and Barrier Busters.  Tonya enjoys the camaraderie and walk-in atmosphere at WHP.  Spending more time with clients and helping with a wide range of problems is just one of the things she loves about her job.  

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In 2002, Tonya became a union steward and continues to work protecting employee rights and job security.  Tonya is also trained in medical insurance billing, procurement, expenses and inventory, and while at WIC she performed quality assessments and trainings for the WIC office.  After attending Washtenaw Community College years ago, Tonya has returned to pursue a degree in Social Work. She received the highest grade ever achieved in her psychology class!  She is looking forward to learning and having more opportunities as she completes her degree.  

Tonya is celebrating 25 years with her husband, has four children and two grandchildren. She has lived in Washtenaw County since she was six years old and considers herself a Michigander.  In her free time, she loves to spend time celebrating holidays with her family.  She loves to read suspense thrillers--Dean Koontz is a favorite.  She also loves the writings of Toni Morrison and Richard Wright.  Her favorite movie is Forrest Gump, but she enjoys a good thriller too.  She loves listening to music, everything from A to Z. 

WHP is so happy to have Tonya as part of our staff.  Considerate, calm, knowledgeable  and very helpful, clients love her and she helps them tremendously.  Lucky us!   

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WHP Staff Profile: Krista Nordberg

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Meet our Queen of Enrollment and Outreach!

Have a policy question about Medicaid? Need to know the best way to make sure an entire family has health care? Want to understand the difference between QMB and SLMB, or SSI and SSDI? The go-to person in the WHP office is Krista Nordberg. 

Krista Nordberg has spent the last 25 years working as an advocate for people's rights through the legal system as a lawyer and legal advocate.  She has provided legal representation and assistance for low-income clients in the areas of housing, consumer and family law.  As the Assistant Director of the Counsel Advocacy Law Line she supervised a team of attorneys who performed legal intake services, case reviews and advice for 12,000 clients per year.  While working for Legal Services of South Central Michigan (LSSCM), Krista worked as a Staff Attorney (Ann Arbor) and Managing Attorney (Lansing).  

Since 2007, Krista has been the Director of Enrollment and Advocacy Services at the Washtenaw Health Plan.  She has trained and nurtured various staff members and AmeriCorps Community Resource Navigators (for example, Haley Haddad, Amber Wells, Michael Randall and Will Cheatham), all of whom have progressed in their careers with a strong sense of advocacy. 

Since joining the WHP as an AmeriCorps member, Krista has acted as a phenomenal mentor, showing me how important it is to be passionate about your work. Krista continues to be inspirational as I build my career and daily I strive to be as kind and dedicated as her.
— Haley Haddad, Americorps 2012-2013
Krista rocks the orange safety vest as she has people check in at a fire safety drill. 

Krista rocks the orange safety vest as she has people check in at a fire safety drill. 

As our Queen, I mean Director, Krista leads the fight for healthcare coverage for all through the Washtenaw Health Plan. Krista is known for sharing enrollment policy updates, answering questions from case managers across the county, providing leadership and collaborating with Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for Medicaid enrollment and advocacy,  leading a staff trained as Certified Application Counselors for the Marketplace, and--in general--spreading the message that healthcare matters. 

Krista is a once in a lifetime kinda boss. One that takes you in and adopts you, coaches you and gets you ready to fly. I owe so much to my experience under her leadership and I am a better public servant because of it.
— Michael Randall, Americorps 2014
Krista and her daughters, Lucy and Sally.

Krista and her daughters, Lucy and Sally.

Krista has won the Washtenaw County Manager of the Year, the NAACP Distinguished Lillian D. Wald Civil Rights Award and she was a Commissioner on the Human Relations Commission for City of Ypsilanti.  But she doesn't want you to know about those awards.  Awards, in her opinion, are not as important as people getting healthcare, human rights and justice! 

And she dances! Krista loves salsa and travels to dance in California, Cuba or anywhere there is a good rueda.  She has two wonderful, smart daughters and lives in a tiny house with a cat, Logan. 

What stands out about Krista is that she is a fierce advocate, and she combines that with a strong sense of compassion. Clients are always asking for her by name, because she helped them before, and they know she will help them again.
— Ruth Kraut, WHP Program Administrator

-M. Buhalis

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Last Two Weeks: Walk-In and Evening Hours! Spread the Word! Tell Your Friends!

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Open Enrollment ends December 15th. Don't miss this window of opportunity!

We have walk-in hours, Mon.-Fri. from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., at 555 Towner in Ypsilanti, MI. You can also call for information or an appointment at 734-544-3030. 

EXTRA!!! SPECIAL EVENING HOURS!!! 12/13 until 8pm!

The WHP office will be open on Wednesday, December 13th until 8 p.m.!!!!

Map to WHP office or call (734)544-3030

HELP US!

Help your friends, clients and community! 

Download and distribute the flyer below.

Friends let friends know:

Dec. 15th is the deadline to sign up for 2018 healthcare on the Marketplace (healthcare.gov).

Here is the link to the poster.

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Six Things I Learned about Healthcare While Working at the WHP

Editors Note: This post was written by a wonderful summer intern, Madeline Higgins, as a reflection on her work over the summer. Madeline is a student in the MPH program at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and we are sure she will go on to do great things!

I was lucky to intern at the Washtenaw Health Plan this past summer, where I got to observe the services that WHP provides and work with a new program involving Community Health Workers. Meanwhile, the federal government was attempting to greatly reduce the Affordable Care Act, which had the potential to negatively impact the health of residents in Washtenaw County. While I learned many facts, protocols, and systems, the items listed stick out most in my memory.

 

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1. There is a significant gap in understanding of the reality of healthcare and policy impact from federal legislators.

I believe this stems from decision makers finding information that enforces their current worldview instead of looking at fact-based data. While watching and reading about the legislative process for healthcare reform, I was struck by the lack of listening and understanding from both sides of the aisle. While everyone utilized individual stories to demonstrate their points, there was little conversation about population-level health outcomes. After reading reports and statistics which utilized a population health framework, it is obvious to me that overall, the Affordable Care Act has positively impacted health in the US.

 

2. You can work minimum wage full time and not qualify for Medicaid (as a single individual household).

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I learned this towards the end of my time with WHP. I hadn’t done the math before, and it was hard for me to imagine living on the minimum wage in the Ann Arbor area in regards to housing costs, let alone health care. To me, this further demonstrates the need for a livable minimum wage.

 

 

3. Pre-existing condition protections help us all.

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At some point in our lives, we are likely to experience some health setback where we utilize the healthcare system. It is advantageous to us all to include people with pre-existing conditions in the insurance pool because one day that could be us!

 

 

4. Everyone has questions about healthcare- and it is important to find places to get good information.

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The Washtenaw Health Plan is a great place to ask for help! No matter your insurance plan, there seem to be terms and deadlines that won’t make a lot of sense until you ask an expert or seek reliable resources. I also wrote a blog post this past summer about reliable resources regarding health care access, and it totally changed the way that I look for information about health.

 

5. People who do direct service work can (and must) also do policy advocacy.

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Washtenaw County is organized and ready for action! I sat in on many meetings where people were putting their heads together to make sure they had the right information to talk to colleagues, legislators, and their clients about how federal policy change (for example, reduction in SNAP benefits) is detrimental to our community. This is vital to both keeping their jobs but also elevating the health status of the Washtenaw County population.

 

6. Above all, if healthcare was treated like a human right, the tone of this conversation would be very different.

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People at the WHP recognize that healthcare is more complicated than having access to insurance. Health is about access to nutritious foods, opportunities to relax, space to exercise, and of course the occasional donut from Dom’s. Working in the county government showed the interconnectedness of the systems that comprise of people’s access to health. I believe if we are more inclusive to people’s needs we can work together to improve the health of Washtenaw County.

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Washtenaw Health Plan Services for Immigrants

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Here at the WHP we provide confidential services to all people regardless of their immigration status.  We assist individuals and families with any health coverage needs, from identifying eligibility to completing applications.  We help people figure out if they are eligible for Medicaid, MOMS, Emergency Medicaid, Washtenaw Health Plan, or the Marketplace (subsidized insurance under the Affordable Care Act).  WHP even assists individuals whom need help understanding their employer’s insurance options.

To ensure that all individuals and families have access to services and resources at WHP, we have Arabic, French, and Spanish speakers on staff.  In addition, we have access to a language line that provides real-time interpretation services for anyone who prefers to receive information in their native language.  Our language line services assist us in helping families in understanding documents, and gives families the confidence to ask the questions they need answered. The language line can assist with over 240 different languages.

WHP staff (and Public Health staff) have access to interpreter services for Acholi to Zyphe from  Language Line Solutions .  

WHP staff (and Public Health staff) have access to interpreter services for Acholi to Zyphe from Language Line Solutions.  

In addition to helping individuals and families identifying what health coverage they are eligible for, WHP can provide families with referrals and resources to address additional needs that go beyond health. We refer families to agencies throughout Washtenaw County. Some of our referrals include: Catholic Social ServicesJewish Family Services and Hope Clinic.

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With the current immigration climate, we are aware that many individuals and families need the necessary resources to feel safe in their community. WHP provides families with Know Your Rights information, including updated lists of attorneys helping community members with immigration questions and community organizations that advocate for immigrants such as the Washtenaw County ID Project and Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights (WICIR).  WHP can now notarize Power of Attorney forms and translate foreign driver’s licenses.

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In May 2017, the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners approved funding and resolutions to aid immigrants regardless of citizenship or immigration status. One of the resolutions includes Washtenaw County being a welcoming community, respecting and cooperating with all families.  Another resolution specifies that Washtenaw County policy is to only ask about immigration services for specific purposes, allowing people to feel safe when interacting with the county government. Lastly, having a policy in place to aid in restricting deportation and provide more appropriate immigration sanctions for immigrants and non-citizens who have been convicted of crimes.  As Washtenaw County employees, we support these resolutions everyday in our work. 

The Washtenaw Health Plan is dedicated to helping people access and receive healthcare regardless of their immigration status.  All WHP staff recently attended the Welcome Michigan Statewide Convening to discuss supporting and welcoming immigrants across Michigan. 

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-T. South Peterson

Have questions about healthcare?  Call 734-544-3030 or walk-in to our office Monday - Friday from 9am-4pm.  Post a question in the comments section below and we will answer you. 

Healthcare Counts blog posts in Español / Spanish are here.

Information about immigration and healthcare from Healthcare Counts is here.

Washtenaw County Immigration Policy May 2017

Michigan Immigrant Rights Center

National Immigration Law Center

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WHP Profile / Perfil Personal: Spring Quiñones

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Spring Quiñones is a Bilingual Outreach Worker at the Washtenaw Health Plan (WHP). She primarily focuses on doing outreach to the Latino community to help them understand and obtain health care coverage, working to remove barriers and ensure that the Latino population enjoys equal access to health care services.

Spring Quiñones es una trabajadora de alcance bilingüe para el Washtenaw Health Plan (WHP). Ella se enfoca principalmente en ayudar a la comunidad latina para entender, obtener cobertura de salud, y eliminar barreras que les impiden disfrutar de acceso igual a los servicios de salud.

Prior to her start at WHP, Spring worked with Ann Arbor Public Schools as a Teacher’s Assistant for 6 years, working specifically with children with autism—which she absolutely loved. Spring first joined the WHP in 2013 under a federal grant from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) to work with immigrant and homeless populations, ensuring they had equitable access to healthcare coverage.  Her primary focus was enrolling children and their families from the Latino Community and collaborating with the Education Project for Homeless Youth (EPHY) to make sure that they had Medicaid, MiChild and or the Marketplace. Spring also brings her skills as a Certified Bilingual Medical Interpreter to help facilitate questions around medical issues.

Antes de trabajar en el WHP, Spring trabajo con las escuelas públicas de Ann Arbor como asistente de profesor por 6 años, específicamente ella trabajo con niños con autismo—lo cual fue algo que disfruto mucho. Spring se unió al WHP en 2013 bajo una beca federal de los Centros de Servicios de Medicaid y Medicare (CMS) para trabajar con inmigrantes y personas sin hogar, asegurándose de que ellos tuvieran acceso equitativo a la cobertura de salud. Su objetivo principal era matricular a los niños y sus familias de la comunidad latina y colaborar con el Proyecto de Educación para Jóvenes Sin Hogar para asegurarse de que ellos tuvieran Medicaid, MiChild, o el Mercado de Seguro. Spring también trae sus habilidades como una Intérprete Médica Bilingüe Acreditada para ayudar a facilitar preguntas sobre temas médicos.

Spring’s compassionate nature and dedication to her work is contagious. She goes above and beyond to make sure her clients feel listened to, and her involvement in helping the Latino community does not stop with her work at WHP.

Spring es una persona muy compasiva y dedicada, su pasión por su trabajo es contagiosa. Ella va más allá para asegurarse de que sus clientes se sientan escuchados, y su participación en ayudar a la comunidad latina no termina con su trabajo en WHP.

Spring and Frania at an outreach event for families providing information about healthcare.

Spring and Frania at an outreach event for families providing information about healthcare.

Spring is also involved with the Washtenaw County Spanish Healthcare Outreach Collaborative (SHOC), where she helps facilitate meetings with organizations to discuss issues affecting the Latino community.  This collaboration is a valuable resource for information and network building that helps to eliminate barriers facing the Latino community. Spring emphasizes the importance of practicing cultural humility when engaging and educating the Latino community about issues surrounding health care, recognizing that things such as immigration, language, and culture can have a significant impact on health care delivery and access to health care services. 

Spring también está involucrada con el Spanish Healthcare Outreach Collaborative (SHOC), donde ayuda a facilitar reuniones con organizaciones para discutir cosas que afectan a la comunidad latina. Esta colaboración es un recurso valioso para informar ycrear redes sociales que ayudan eliminar los obstáculos que enfrenta la comunidad latina. Spring enfatiza la importancia de practicar la humildad cultural al participar y educar la comunidad latina sobre asuntos relacionados con la salud, reconociendo que elementos como la inmigración, el lenguaje, y la  cultura pueden tener un impacto significativo en la entrega y acceso a los servicios de salud.

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Spring has two children, an 18 year old daughter, and a 19 year old son, and a dog named Milo. She is originally from Colombia and previously lived in New York, and has now lived in Ann Arbor for the past 11 years.

Spring tiene dos hijos, una hija de 18 años, un hijo de 19 años, y una mascota llamado Milo. Ella es originalmente de Colombia, vivió previamente en Nueva York, y ha vivido en Ann Arbor por los últimos 11 años.

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Actualizado ** Entendiendo el Deducible de Medicaid, o "Spenddown"

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In English - Updated** Understanding A Medicaid Deductible, or "Spenddown"

La mayoría de los programas de Medicaid cubren todos los beneficios esenciales de salud, como visitas al médico y al hospital, servicios de atención dental y de visión. Sin embargo, algunos programas sólo cubren beneficios limitados. Por ejemplo, el Medicaid de Servicios de Emergencia y el programa MOMS (información aqui) proporcionan servicios parciales a los inmigrantes. Otro programa "parcial" se llama el programa Deducible de Medicaid (anteriormente llamado Medicaid Spenddown).


El programa de Deducible de Medicaid está disponible para personas con discapacidades, ancianos, niños y padres de niños que están sobre el límite de ingresos para el Medicaid completo. A fin de calificar para un deducible, también tendría que cumplir con una prueba de activos (que tiene en cuenta sus activos, excluyendo una casa y un coche). Un individuo que está sobre el límite de ingresos para Medicaid y tiene muy pocos activos puede ser aprobado para el programa de deducible. El Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos (DHHS) especificará la cantidad del deducible, un número que oscila entre menos de cien dólares y varios miles de dólares. Este número se basa en los ingresos de su hogar.

LA IDEA ES SIMPLE, PERO LA ACCIÓN ES COMPLICADA

Con un deducible mensual de Medicaid, para que Medicaid llegue a ser completamente activo, las facturas que ascienden al deducible deben ser alcanzadas en un mes determinado. El individuo es entonces responsable del deducible y DHHS paga el resto. Por ejemplo, digamos que el deducible de Martha fue fijado en $ 800, y Martha tiene una factura del hospital en Mayo por $ 5,000.

Martha es responsable de pagar los $ 800 al hospital y DHHS paga $ 4,200. Para que DHHS pague, se debe presentar un informe de deducible.

Si la factura fue incurrida el 1 de Mayo y se presentó un reporte de deducible, durante el resto del mes Martha tiene Medicaid completo y Medicaid pagaría por cualquier servicio médico necesario, como gafas, limpieza dental o medicamentos. A partir del 1 de Junio, Martha no tiene Medicaid, pero de nuevo tendría que cumplir con un deducible.

Si Martha ingresó al hospital el 31 de Mayo y no tenía gastos médicos antes de esa fecha, no alcanzaría el deducible hasta el 31 de Mayo. A partir del 1 de Junio, el deducible / spenddown se restablecería, por lo que probablemente no sería posible de que le limpien los dientes en Mayo! Algunas personas, particularmente las personas que viven en hogares de ancianos, cumplen con su deducible cada mes, pero la mayoría de la gente no.

Recuerde: Para que Medicaid se active, las facturas y un Reporte de Deducible deben ser enviados al trabajador social del DHHS. El deducible debe ser alcanzado de nuevo cada mes para que Medicaid se active.

 

LOS DEDUCIBLES DE MEDICAID PUEDEN AYUDAR, PERO NO SE CUENTAN COMO COBERTURA DE SALUD COMPLETA

Importante: El programa de Deducible de Medicaid no cumple con los mandatos de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio. Esto significa que si esta es la única cobertura que tiene, se le puede aplicar una multa al presentar los impuestos al final del año.
La buena noticia es que usted puede tener un plan del mercado de seguromedicos o una cobertura de seguro de su empleador junto con un deducible de Medicaid. (Recuerde, Medicaid puede ser un seguro secundario.)


¿CONSEGUÍO LA COBERTURA CORRECTA?

A veces un individuo es aprobado para el programa de deducible pero realmente debe tener Medicaid completo. Si usted piensa que debe tener cobertura completa, la oficina del Washtenaw Health Plan ofrece una evaluación gratuita. Para obtener ayuda para presentar las facturas de su deducible de Medicaid o si cree que debe recibir Medicaid completo, vaya a la oficina del Washtenaw Health Plan. El horario de atención es de lunes a viernes de 9:00am a 4:00pm. Estamos ubicados en 555 Towner, Ypsilanti, MI.


¿Preguntas? Llame (734) 544-3030.

-Haley Haddad, Ingrid Fonseca, Ruth Kraut and Meredith Buhalis

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Who Is The WHP And What Do We Do?

Who is the Washtenaw Health Plan?

The simple answer to the question of who is the Washtenaw Health Plan goes like this:

We are a non-profit. We are a public-private partnership supported with the help of Washtenaw County, our local health systems, University of Michigan Health System and St. Joseph Mercy Health System, and other local healthcare providers. We started as a safety net health program for low-income Washtenaw County residents who didn't have access to insurance, and we still run that program. [Read about our history here.]

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But now, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, more people have other options--Medicaid, the Marketplace, employer insurance. So the WHP's Plan B safety net program still exists, but first we'll see if you qualify for insurance that meets the Affordable Care Act mandate. We believe in healthcare coverage. We have seen it save lives. The Affordable Care Act is not perfect, but we believe it moves us in the right direction--toward healthcare for all

So nowadays, we spend most of our time helping people figure out their healthcare options

The WHP staff at our holiday celebration!  Come meet us in person! 

The WHP staff at our holiday celebration!  Come meet us in person! 

We help you assess your healthcare coverage options. We advocate with and for you if you need help with DHHS or the health insurance Marketplace. We have learned a lot about the systems and policies that make the healthcare systems run, and sometimes what might seem like magic to you is just us having done this application hundreds of times before. 

We explain unfamiliar terms like deductible and maximum out-of-pocket costs. We listen to what you need. We explain what kind of proofs you need to provide for income or immigration verifications. We write this blog, and maintain this website.

All of this work is motivated by a deep and abiding belief that everybody deserves access to health care. Yes, everyone. So we'll help people who are parents or kids, tall or short, fat or thin, employed or unemployed, single or families, immigrant or citizen, happy or sad. We'll help you if you know exactly what you are eligible for, or if you have no idea what your options are. We'll speak English, Spanish, French or Arabic in the office, and if you speak a different language--we'll call for interpretation help. We'll help you if you live in Washtenaw County, and we'll help you if you don't. 

In Other Words: We Help People--Like You!

And, in fact, the tagline of our new advertising campaign is: We Help People--Like You!

Our hope for 2017 is that we will help even more people like you.

With our new ad campaign, we've got ads running on buses with our friends over at the Ann Arbor Area Transportation Authority (also known as The Ride). We are distributing posters around town as well. Thanks to The Ride for donating the advertising space on the buses, and thanks to Pete Sickman-Garner for his graphics design work.

Look for these posters on The Ride!

Look for these posters on The Ride!

We've shown you some of the advertising posters in this blog post, but here's how you can help us!

1. Download some poster copies here (they print in 8-1/2" x 11" or 11" x 17"). Post them where you work or play! You can also share them electronically or on social media. 

2. Ride the bus? Take a picture of one of our posters on the bus. Tag us on social media, and we'll send you a prize pack! You can find us on facebook, instagram, and twitter @coveragecounts. 

3. Have you been helped by us? Word of mouth works--tell your friends! (Also--reviews work too. Feel free to review the Washtenaw Health Plan on Yelp or Google+.)

Here's to 2017! Help Us Help More People--Like You!

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WHP Profile: Michael Randall

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In 2013, as the Washtenaw Health Plan was searching for an Americorps volunteer to be a Community Resource Navigator, the resume of Michael Randall crossed the desk of Krista Nordberg, WHP's Director of Enrollment. That turned out to be the right choice, because Michael found value in the work and has a great way of connecting with people. As a Community Resource Navigator, Michael worked with agencies across Washtenaw County supporting the implementation of the Healthy Michigan Plan (Medicaid) and providing access to health care and food assistance for families and individuals.  He trained nonprofit employees and volunteers to provide access to public benefits. When his Americorps time was up, Michael stayed on with the WHP.

Michael discussing the Affordable Care Act and its impact.  

One of Michael's outreach jobs as an Americorps volunteer was to visit some smaller communities. As Laura Seyfried, Executive Director of the Manchester Community Resource Center noted,

"Michael worked with mutual clients at the Community Resource Center during his time as an Americorps Community Navigator. His calm, understanding manner really helped the clients feel at ease when talking with him about their needs and situation. His approach was empathetic yet informative and built confidence in the client. I can see Michael's future as a leader in human service advocacy or politics."
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In fact, Michael Randall is a tireless advocate for individuals.  He started helping people back in 2006 as a Patient Attendant, as he was working his way through college.  He continued working with individuals as he transitioned to an internship at the Ypsilanti Housing Commission-Chesapeake Community Partners. 

In the midst of all this work, Michael married the love of his life, the lovely Alaina, in June 2015. Michael and Alaina are vegans who love to cook and eat together.  In his spare time, Michael is also the President of Bridge Young Adult Ministries.  Michael found a new appreciation for all that libraries and librarians do when he became a Trustee of the Ypsilanti District Library in 2015.

Michael Randall being sworn in as a Trustee of the Ypsilanti District Library.

Michael Randall being sworn in as a Trustee of the Ypsilanti District Library.

If Michael had a personal slogan, it would certainly include the word Community.  It is part of all that he does every day.  WHP is lucky to have his smile, enthusiasm and tireless advocacy. He really does embody our unofficial tag line, We Help People.  

Thanks, Michael Randall, for making sure that Coverage Counts!

 

 

 

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