HELP! I got cut off of Medicaid!

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ASK: Why did I get cut off Medicaid?

Remember that you can get cut off of Medicaid because your income has risen, because the number of dependents has changed, or because you didn’t fill out an annual renewal (redetermination) form.

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So first, figure out whether the cancellation was correct.

Should Medicaid Have Been Cancelled?

Let’s take a few examples:

  1. You failed to fill out an annual redetermination form, but nothing else in your life has changed. Medicaid is renewed annually, and sometimes people in a household are on different cycles, so you may need to fill out renewals more than once a year. If nothing has changed, you should still be eligible for Medicaid, and should reapply at MI Bridges.

  2. Your income and/or household size has changed. Even a small increase in hours or pay/hour (minimum wage is going up!) can make a big difference. Especially if there are multiple earners in a household, things can get complicated. Here’s how to figure out if your income is still eligible. Income limits for Medicaid.

    Your household size also may have changed. Perhaps a child has grown up and is now on their own; perhaps you got a divorce; perhaps someone in your family died; perhaps parents or grandparents have moved into your household. While you are looking at income, don’t forget to look at household size.

    Remember that eligibility is a combination of both household size and income. If you feel the determination was made incorrectly, you can reapply, or file a hearing (Part 1 and Part 2).

But What If the Determination Was Correct, And You’re Not Eligible For Medicaid?

Good News: You Qualify for a Special Enrollment Period

Employer Insurance

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If your employer offers affordable health insurance, you generally are required to enroll. When your Medicaid ends, it opens a Special Enrollment Period for you to enroll in your employer health care.

It could be that the employer insurance is offered to someone else in the household, but you are eligible. With a Medicaid denial letter, you can get on their employer insurance with a Special Enrollment Period.

For an employer special enrollment period, you only have 30 days to take advantage of the offer, so don’t delay!

Marketplace (Healthcare.gov)

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If your employer does not offer you insurance, you can apply on the Marketplace (healthcare.gov), and you will likely qualify for good tax credits. [If you don’t, please give us a call. You may have fallen into a “family glitch” or answered a question incorrectly.]

For the Marketplace, you have 60 days from the day your insurance ends for the special enrollment period. You will need to prove that you have lost your Medicaid insurance with a denial letter.

 

Questions? We Help People.

Call us at 734-544-3030

Walk in to our office at 555 Towner in Ypsilanti,

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

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