Four Reasons (Aside From The Work Requirement) To Ask Governor Snyder To Veto The Medicaid Work Requirements Bill

As if the Medicaid work requirements, discussed more fully in our last blog post, are not enough, there are four other problems with the Medicaid Work Requirements bill, also known as SB 897. This analysis quotes a FamiliesUSA blog post, written by Eliot Fishman, Senior Director of Health Policy. Read his full blog post here.

Read the House Fiscal Agency Legislative Analysis here. You can find a lot of the details in the House Fiscal Agency Legislative Analysis.

As Fishman notes:  

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1. The Bill Gives the Trump Administration and Washington Bureaucrats the Power to Kill the Healthy Michigan Program: As of now, with the Affordable Care Act surviving in Congress, the only people who can take Healthy Michigan coverage away or Michiganders and their state officials. But the new bill gives the Federal government one year to approve Michigan’s waiver request or the Healthy Michigan program goes away, leaving all of its enrollees with no health insurance...
2. The Bill Includes a Bizarrely Punitive Premium for Near-Poor Working People: People with incomes just over the poverty line come in for particularly harsh treatment in the bill. Anyone with an income between 100% and 138% of the poverty level for four years or more are forced to pay 5% of their income—far higher than any premium in Medicaid in any other state—or lose their coverage. This would create a strong incentive to REDUCE income to under the poverty line...
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3. The Bill Would Lock People Out of Coverage for a Year for Paperwork Discrepancies: The bill creates a broad mandate on Michigan Medicaid to take coverage away from people in the Healthy Michigan program for a year if they are found to have “misrepresented their compliance” in required monthly reporting of their work hours...
4. The Bill Creates a Crazy, Rushed Timeline for the Snyder Administration to Write and Submit a Waiver: The Snyder administration is required to submit a waiver to the Trump administration by October 1, 2018.  But federal and state law require the waiver to be submitted for public and tribal consultation starting 60 days before federal submission—so no later than the end of July. That gives Michigan Medicaid just a few weeks to lay out their plans to implement this complex mess of a bill.

You can ask Governor Snyder to veto this bill. Contact Governor Snyder here.

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Medicaid Work Requirements Pass The House

The Medicaid work requirements bill, Senate Bill 897, passed the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday, June 6, 2018 on a party line vote, 17-10.  The bill was approved by the Michigan House of Representatives by a vote of 62-47.  The House-amended bill heads back to the GOP-controlled Senate, where it is expected to pass as soon as Thursday.  Next up is the Governor's office

The Washtenaw Health Plan remains opposed to Medicaid work requirements. We believe that healthcare is a human right, and that Medicaid work requirements will keep people from getting necessary healthcare. 

The proposed bill has many improvements over previous versions. Here are a few changes:

  • It requires an average of 80 hours/month of qualifying work activities, down from the earlier proposal of 29 hours/week. 
  • It exempts individuals age 63 and 64, who may have retired early and be drawing social security.
  • It only applies to Healthy Michigan Plan Medicaid recipients, and no others
  • It includes educational activities, job training, and vocational training, as well as unpaid internships, to meet the requirements.
  • it would allow recipients to have 3 months of noncompliance in a 12-month period, and after that, the recipient would lose coverage for at least 1 month (reduced from 1  year) and would need to be compliant to re-enroll.
This bill does one thing: it takes healthcare away from some of our state’s most vulnerable residents. We strongly urge the House to defeat the bill and if not, we call on the governor to veto this harmful piece of legislation.
— Gilda Z. Jacobs, Michigan League for Public Policy

There's more...Much more

Read the House Fiscal Agency Legislative Analysis here.

You can still oppose the bill. If you would like, you can send your comments to the governor, requesting his veto.   

Email:  governorsoffice@michigan.gov 

Phone: 517-373-3400 or 517-335-7858 (Constituent Services) 

From the Michigan League for Public Policy:  Bill takes healthcare away from people and families, does nothing to address barriers to employment.

We wrote about how Medicaid was helping and improving our state:  The Benefits of the ACA Go Beyond Health #thanksACA.

 

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Who Is DHHS And What Do They Do?

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The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services is the largest state department. The department was created by a merger of the Michigan Department of Community Health and the Department of Human Services in the spring of 2015. 

DHHS has several important departments that affect many of the people of the state of Michigan. 

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These programs include financial and health assistance programs, foster care and protective services, health statistics, and community health interventions. In many cases, the Washtenaw Health Plan and the Washtenaw County Health Department work closely with DHHS. Even though we may help people apply for Medicaid, it is DHHS that determines eligibility. 

Medicaid and Financial Assistance (cash assistance, food assistance)


  Washtenaw Cty WIC office staff. 

Washtenaw Cty WIC office staff. 

Women Infants and Children (WIC)--policies are set at the state level, but of course you can visit the Washtenaw County Health Department for WIC services.  WIC services include Food Packages, Nutrition Education, Breastfeeding Promotion and Support and more.  


Foster Care and Adoption Services: Washtenaw County is looking for additional foster care families. Interested? Follow the link!


Michigan Rehabilitation Services provides specialized employment and education-related services and training to assist teens and adults with disabilities in becoming employed or retaining employment.


Native American Affairs provides a broad range of social services to protect, preserve and strengthen Native American families both on and off tribal lands.


Child and Adult Protective Services: Have a concern about someone? Call 855-444-3911 to trigger an investigation.


Chronic Diseases: The State of Michigan chronic disease team works closely with the Washtenaw County Health Department and other county health departments around the state.


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Communicable Diseases: The state works closely with health departments around the state to track diseases like Hepatitis A. Find Washtenaw County data here


Epidemiology and Statistics: Learn about infant mortality, cancer statistics, and other vital statistics.


Policy and Planning: Here is where you can find policy manuals that guide much of the state's work.

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Medicaid Work Requirements Passes the Senate--What Next?

Medicaid work requirements were discussed in a public hearing at the Michigan Senate Competitiveness Committee on April 18, 2018. You can watch it! The WHP's Ruth Kraut and Medicaid recipient Claire Maitre speak at 13:54 (Ruth) and 30:45 (Claire). 

The following day, April 19th, the bill was voted out of the Senate. It passed 26-11, with one Republican joining 10 Democrats in voting against the bill. The bill now moves to the House.

Problems with video?  Click here.

Here is the link to the S2 (second substitute) of SB 897, which is what was voted on. Read the bill.

Read the history of the bill here.

We've been writing about work requirements and Medicaid. Read more below.

What Can You Do Now?

Now that the bill has passed the Senate and been sent to the Legislature, no matter where you live in the State of Michigan, you can contact your Representative and tell him or her how you feel about the bill. 

Find your Michigan Representative here

Send a letter to your Representative via Michigan League for Public Policy. 

Contact Governor Snyder! Call 517-335-7858 or 517-373-3400 or click here.

Check healthcarecounts.org regularly for updates on this issue.

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Tax Day Is Coming! Here's What You Need

 April 15th falls on a Sunday, and Washington DC celebrates Emancipation Day (the day Lincoln freed the slaves) on Monday, April 16th so Tax Day is Tuesday, April 17, 2018. 

April 15th falls on a Sunday, and Washington DC celebrates Emancipation Day (the day Lincoln freed the slaves) on Monday, April 16th so Tax Day is Tuesday, April 17, 2018. 

In 2017, you were required to have insurance all year unless you qualified for an exemption. You might have gotten your insurance from an employer, from public insurance (Medicaid, Medicare, VA coverage), or from private insurance (purchased separately or from the Marketplace). And now your 2017 taxes are due. Don't get confused, get organized!

 

Forms, Forms, Forms...

If you got insurance from an employer or public insurance, you should have gotten 1095-B or 1095-C forms from them. You can file your taxes without those forms, though, because they are also reporting to the IRS.

If you got insurance through the Marketplace, you need the 1095-A form. You can find that online in your healthcare.gov account. With the information you have on the 1095-A form, you can reconcile your tax credits, which you do using IRS Form 8962.

Find out more about how to reconcile tax credits with this handy explanation.

If you got private insurance without tax credits, your insurer should have your 1095-A, and you don't file for tax credits. You still have to submit the 1095-A as proof you had insurance.

 

I Didn't Have Insurance. Can I Get An Exemption?

If you didn't have insurance for the whole year, you might have qualified for an exemption. Common exemptions would be: 

  • you were uncovered for less than 3 months (perhaps you moved or switched jobs)
  • cost of insurance for the household was more than 8% of your income and was unaffordable
  • your income is below the tax-filing threshold 
  • you were living out of the country for all or part of the year.

There are other exemptions, too. You file for an exemption using IRS Form 8965. Find out more below. 

 

No Exemption?  No Insurance?  Pay a penalty.

If you don't qualify for an exemption, and you didn't have insurance, you might need to pay a penalty. For the 2017 plan year, the fee is calculated 2 different ways — as a percentage of your yearly household income, and per person. You’ll pay whichever is higher.

1. Percentage of income: 2.5% of yearly household income. The maximum is the total yearly premium for the national average price of a Bronze plan sold through the Marketplace.

or

2. Per person per year: $695 per adult or $347.50 per child under 18. The maximum is $2,085 per household. 

 

A Household Is Made Up Of Individuals

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NOTE: Think about each person in the household separately! In some cases, you may have one person on the Marketplace or with employer insurance, one person with an exemption based on affordability, and a child on Medicaid or MIChild.

If you finish your taxes, you realize you will owe some money, and you don't want that to happen again, come visit us at 555 Towner, Ypsilanti, MI M-F 9-4 p.m., or call us at 734-544-3030, for a free consultation.

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Medicaid work requirements: A prescription for problems

“We’ll call you with the results on Monday.”

If you’ve ever left your doctor’s office after hearing those words, then you’re familiar with the dread. Minutes become hours, hours become days, and the worst fears tend to enter your mind no matter how hard you try to suppress them.

Waiting for that call is excruciating. But a law being proposed in Lansing would make it a lot worse for many in our state.

Michigan’s Senate Bill 897 is ethically, logically and morally wrong; it threatens the healthcare of hundreds of thousands of Michiganders. And it’s going to cost us a boatload.

The bill comes on the heels of a change at the federal level that allows states to request waivers to enforce work requirements on Medicaid recipients.

First, let’s look at what Medicaid is. Medicaid is healthcare. It was designed to help sick people get well and to help healthy people stay that way. And it does a pretty great job. Michiganders with low incomes are able to sleep at night knowing that they can receive healthcare through Medicaid and Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program, the Healthy Michigan Plan. Since its creation in 1965, that’s what Medicaid has been: A healthcare plan.

Now, let’s look at what Medicaid is not. Medicaid is not a jobs program. Jobs programs help train workers, eliminate barriers like transportation and childcare issues, and work with local governments, community members and businesses to find solutions to problems in workforce development. By all means, let’s invest in solid jobs programs!

But some in the Michigan Legislature think we need to complicate the health plan by adding layers of bureaucracy and obstacles with work requirements. Here are a few logical truths to counter the myths being used to push work requirements:

  1. Most Medicaid recipients who can work are already working. Those who don’t work are students, caregivers, retired or in poor health.
  2. Michiganders enrolled in Healthy Michigan are doing better at work and are able to find work because they have healthcare. It’s not a big stretch: Being healthy makes it easier to thrive in the workplace. But it doesn’t work the other way around. Being at work doesn’t suddenly cure health problems.
  3. Medicaid recipients, employers, doctors and state employees will be burdened with paperwork, red tape and additional hurdles. These complications will strain the state and cause many struggling Michiganders to lose coverage.
  4. It’s going to cost us. Kentucky, which recently implemented work requirements, reports that just setting up the infrastructure to track work requirements will cost nearly $187 million in the first six months alone.
  5. Work requirements are potentially illegal. Under the act that created the Medicaid program, certain parts of the Medicaid Act can be waived, but new eligibility criteria cannot be imposed—in this case, the criteria of work in order to qualify for Medicaid. Legal challenges have already begun in Kentucky that could have repercussions on any states pursuing work requirements. Michigan lawmakers should wait and see how that case unfolds.

I’m obviously urging you to take action on this issue. But I’m also asking you to start talking about it. Talk to your friends, your neighbors, your family. Help them to understand what Medicaid is and what it is not.

I also hope you’ll listen. Over the years Medicaid has helped millions of Michiganders, from those going through a rough patch to those struggling with chronic health problems or terminal illness. It is likely that someone you love or know has benefited from Medicaid. Take the time to listen to how it helped them temporarily or on a long-term basis. And encourage them to share their story to make a difference.

 If you have a personal story about how Medicaid and having reliable healthcare has enabled you to work or look for work, please share it!  Click here. 

If you have a personal story about how Medicaid and having reliable healthcare has enabled you to work or look for work, please share it!  Click here. 

Healthy people are better able to work, but working people do not automatically become healthy. Let’s stop discussing unnecessary plans like this and instead focus on the real things Michigan residents need to work and provide for their families, including Medicaid and other assistance programs, job training, adult education, high-quality child care, reliable public transportation, and more.

 Added April 4th, 2018 by Gilda Z. Jacobs  

By Gilda Z. Jacobs, president & CEO of the Michigan League for Public Policy since 2011

April 4, 2018 

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For These Four Working Households, Medicaid--Without Work Requirements--Matters

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The idea of work requirements for Michiganders on Medicaid is rather abstract. Unfortunately, it would have significant negative consequences. Here are some real stories of people that we have worked with in the past year. (Names have been changed.)

What unites these families is that--even though, in each case, someone in the household is working--under the proposed work requirements for Medicaid, they wouldn't qualify for Medicaid. Here are their stories.

Marsha and Will: Bad Luck and Poor Health Means Medicaid is More Important Than Ever

Marsha and WIll are a married couple in their fifties, and their kids are now all grown. In 2016, they were both working low-wage jobs in the service industry. Their combined income was around $28,000/year. They could afford their rent, and their car, and they qualified for tax credits on the Marketplace. In early 2017, WIll lost his job. He was looking for a job, but now they were living on Marsha's job at Subway, which was averaging about 28 hours/week. Paying for rent was tough, but at least they now qualified for Medicaid. After about six months of being unemployed, Will had a heart attack and was in the hospital for five days. 

Under proposed Medicaid work requirements, Marsha's work was less than 30 hours/week and Will wasn't working at all--they would not have qualified for Medicaid. When Will had his heart attack, what would have happened?

Virginia: Medicaid is Vital to Mental Health

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Virginia is a single woman in her 20s. She has a history of depression and anxiety, and had been helped by Community Mental Health. When she started working 33 hours/week, her income was too high for Medicaid, and as a result she lost her relationship with Community Mental Health. Without medications and support, her anxiety got so bad that she couldn't work at all. Then Virginia became eligible for Medicaid--and Community Mental Health--again. Now, with the support of Medicaid and CMH, she is able to work. Virginia now keeps her work hours at about 25 hours/week, in order to stay eligible for Medicaid and--therefore--CMH. 

With Medicaid work requirements, Virginia might not be able to keep her hours below 30 hours/week. And if her income goes above 30 hours/week, at $11/hour she won't be eligible for Medicaid--or CMH services.

Maria and Jose: Medicaid Keeps The Family Healthy

Maria and Jose have two children, ages 3 and 5. Jose works two jobs so that Maria can stay home with the kids--childcare costs are so high. Jose is offered (and takes!) insurance from his work, but while it would be affordable for him ($100/month), if he were to add the rest of the family it would cost $600/month. So Maria and the kids are on Medicaid, which is a good thing, because Maria and her youngest child have asthma. 

With Medicaid work requirements, Maria wouldn't be eligible for Medicaid unless she were working 30 hours/week. In order to do that, though, they would have to pay for childcare. Without the asthma medication, Maria might end up in the emergency room. 

Jasmine and Mark: Medicaid Allowed Them To Take A Chance And Start A Business

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In 2015 Jasmine and Mark decided to start their own business in Washtenaw County. Investing their life savings, they quit their jobs and started spending long hours on their business. Without income, they and their two kids got Medicaid. In the first year, they did not turn a profit. In their second year, they started making a little bit of money, but were still Medicaid eligible. By year 3, they were over income for Medicaid and went on the Marketplace.

With Medicaid work requirements, in the first two years of their business, their income did not reflect the work they were putting in. How could they prove they were working? Would they qualify for Medicaid?

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Ten Reasons To Oppose Medicaid Work Requirements

Printable pdf of this blog post here.

You may have heard that there are some proposals in the Michigan legislature to require individuals on Medicaid to work in order to continue to qualify for Medicaid  (Proposed in March 2018: Senate Bill 897 and House Bill 5716). The Washtenaw Health Plan and Washtenaw County are opposed to any efforts to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients. Here's why: 

1. Most people on Medicaid are already working.

Those who are not working, are most likely to be found taking care of young children, elderly relatives, to be living in high unemployment areas, or to be in poor health themselves. The vast majority of individuals in Medicaid are in households with at least one working person (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2016). 

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In December 2017, a team of University of Michigan researchers did extensive research on individuals in the Michigan Medicaid expansion, called the Healthy Michigan Plan, population.

  • Nearly half the individuals are working (48.8%)
  • 5% are students
  • Nearly 5% are home taking care of children
  • 11% reported being unable to work because of their health
  • Over one fourth are out of work, many of them because they are in fair or poor health. Three-quarters of those who were out of work reported having a chronic health condition.

NOTE: This study was the first peer-reviewed study from the formal evaluation of Michigan's expansion, called the Healthy Michigan Plan. The evaluation, funded by a contract with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, was required under Michigan's federal waiver. 

As Renuka Tipirneni, lead author of the study notes, "'Is it worth the cost to screen and track enrollees when only a small minority isn't working who are potentially able to work?"

2. The Medicaid expansion has helped improve individuals' health.

Health improvements mean it is more likely that they will be able to work--now or in the future. 

According to the UM IHPI study, "In all, nearly half of the newly covered Michiganders said their physical health improved in the first year of coverage, and nearly 40 percent said their mental or dental health got better. Those who said their health improved also had the most chance of experiencing an effect on their work life. As a group, they were four times more likely to say that getting Medicaid coverage helped them do a better job at work. And those who felt their health had improved, but were out of work, were three times as likely to say that their coverage helped them look for a job."

3. Work requirements can worsen (or externalize) other problems. 

For instance, a person with epilepsy who loses access to seizure medications could have a seizure while driving and have a car accident. The cost, then, is to the individual (who is injured by the car accident and seizure), to the costs to the insurance system, and potentially to other individuals involved in the car accident.

4. Work requirements cost the system more.

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Work requirements drive people to more expensive care. Rather than a person getting preventive care, and a prescription, from a primary care doctor for an easily treated problem like high blood pressure, they are more likely to end up in the emergency room, where they know they will not be turned away. Rather than getting a free flu vaccine, they are more likely to get the flu--ending up infecting others, requiring time off work, and perhaps risking a hospitalization. 

5. Work requirements place a huge administrative burden on Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) staff.  

DHHS staff already struggle under enormous caseloads. The administrative burden of this additional work is significant. The true number of people who could work but aren't is small. Yet requiring people to show that they are working, or cannot work, requires a lot of time on the part of DHHS staff.

 Paperwork photo by Tom Ventura

Paperwork photo by Tom Ventura

6. Work requirements place a huge administrative burden on individuals with Medicaid.

In addition, they are likely to affect many others. For instance, if one person in a family does not return proof they are working, others in the family may be wrongfully cut off. This policy is another bureaucratic obstacle intended to keep poor people from getting healthcare.

7. We are in the midst of an opioid epidemic and a surge in suicides.

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Mental health and substance use disorder services are essential; suicide is preventable. Work requirements make it difficult for individuals getting mental health or substance use treatment to continue to get treatment. In 2015, the State of Michigan's Prescription Drug and Opioid Abuse Task Force report recommended " exploring ways for the State to increase access to care, including wraparound services and MAT [Medication-Assisted Therapy], as indicated by national and state guidelines for treatment. (p. 20)" Work requirements would surely reduce access to care. 

8. Work requirements put physicians and nurses in an untenable position.

Physicians take the Hippocratic oath, to do no harm, but if people are cut off of Medicaid and physicians are unable to get paid for patient visits, their organizations will find it financially untenable to take care of these patients. That is one reason that the American College of Physicians, the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Osteopathic Association, the American Psychiatric Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics have taken a position against Medicaid work requirements. Read their statement here.

9. Work requirements threaten the health of people with disabilities.

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As the IHPI study indicates, many individuals who have Medicaid and are not working are doing so because they are in poor or fair health. In the experience of staff at the Washtenaw Health Plan, in many cases the access to health care allows people to either a) get better, and start working or b) get the necessary evidence from competent physicians to show that they are disabled. Without Medicaid, many individuals would not be able to collect the medical evidence to prove that they are disabled. In 2016, the Kaiser Family Foundation found that 36% of people on Medicaid who are not working are disabled.

10. The Washtenaw Health Plan and the Washtenaw County Health Department believe that healthcare is a human right.

We oppose efforts to reduce access to coverage, and believe in healthcare for all. The Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners agrees with us. Read their resolution here

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WHP Staff Profile: Krista Nordberg

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Meet our Queen of Enrollment and Outreach!

Have a policy question about Medicaid? Need to know the best way to make sure an entire family has health care? Want to understand the difference between QMB and SLMB, or SSI and SSDI? The go-to person in the WHP office is Krista Nordberg. 

Krista Nordberg has spent the last 25 years working as an advocate for people's rights through the legal system as a lawyer and legal advocate.  She has provided legal representation and assistance for low-income clients in the areas of housing, consumer and family law.  As the Assistant Director of the Counsel Advocacy Law Line she supervised a team of attorneys who performed legal intake services, case reviews and advice for 12,000 clients per year.  While working for Legal Services of South Central Michigan (LSSCM), Krista worked as a Staff Attorney (Ann Arbor) and Managing Attorney (Lansing).  

Since 2007, Krista has been the Director of Enrollment and Advocacy Services at the Washtenaw Health Plan.  She has trained and nurtured various staff members and AmeriCorps Community Resource Navigators (for example, Haley Haddad, Amber Wells, Michael Randall and Will Cheatham), all of whom have progressed in their careers with a strong sense of advocacy. 

Since joining the WHP as an AmeriCorps member, Krista has acted as a phenomenal mentor, showing me how important it is to be passionate about your work. Krista continues to be inspirational as I build my career and daily I strive to be as kind and dedicated as her.
— Haley Haddad, Americorps 2012-2013
 Krista rocks the orange safety vest as she has people check in at a fire safety drill. 

Krista rocks the orange safety vest as she has people check in at a fire safety drill. 

As our Queen, I mean Director, Krista leads the fight for healthcare coverage for all through the Washtenaw Health Plan. Krista is known for sharing enrollment policy updates, answering questions from case managers across the county, providing leadership and collaborating with Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for Medicaid enrollment and advocacy,  leading a staff trained as Certified Application Counselors for the Marketplace, and--in general--spreading the message that healthcare matters. 

Krista is a once in a lifetime kinda boss. One that takes you in and adopts you, coaches you and gets you ready to fly. I owe so much to my experience under her leadership and I am a better public servant because of it.
— Michael Randall, Americorps 2014
 Krista and her daughters, Lucy and Sally.

Krista and her daughters, Lucy and Sally.

Krista has won the Washtenaw County Manager of the Year, the NAACP Distinguished Lillian D. Wald Civil Rights Award and she was a Commissioner on the Human Relations Commission for City of Ypsilanti.  But she doesn't want you to know about those awards.  Awards, in her opinion, are not as important as people getting healthcare, human rights and justice! 

And she dances! Krista loves salsa and travels to dance in California, Cuba or anywhere there is a good rueda.  She has two wonderful, smart daughters and lives in a tiny house with a cat, Logan. 

What stands out about Krista is that she is a fierce advocate, and she combines that with a strong sense of compassion. Clients are always asking for her by name, because she helped them before, and they know she will help them again.
— Ruth Kraut, WHP Program Administrator

-M. Buhalis

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1095-A, 1095-B and 1095-C: What are they and what do I do with them?

En Espanol-  1095-A, 1095-B and 1095-C: ¿Qué son y qué debo hacer con ellos?

You may have recently received a form in the mail from DHHS, your employer or the Marketplace. The 1095 form is your "proof of health care coverage" for 2017.  Remember if you did not have health care coverage for more than 3 months, you are required to pay a shared responsibility payment (penalty).  

You will need this form when you go to file your taxes.  There are 3 types of 1095 forms--for Marketplace insurance, public insurance, and employer insurance. If your status changed during the year, or if you had multiple employers, you may get more than one type of 1095!

  Form 1095-A

Form 1095-A

1095-A Health Insurance Marketplace Statement

If you had health care coverage through the Marketplace for any part of 2017,  you will receive a 1095-A.  If you selected electronic communications, you will receive an email notifying you that your 1095-A can be downloaded from your Marketplace account at healthcare.gov.  

Your marketplace statement will indicate your tax credit and this form is used to determine whether you may have to pay part of your tax credit back or whether you will receive more of a tax credit. 

Form 1095-A is used to fill out Form 8962 to reconcile the tax credits you received with your actual 2017 income.  (Read about Form 8962 in this blog post!)

  Form 1095-B

Form 1095-B

1095-B Health Coverage

You will receive a 1095-B form if your health care was provided by your employer or was provided by the government through the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP, MIChild in Michigan), Medicaid, Medicare or a basic health plan.  These forms may not be mailed until after March 2.  The IRS states it is not necessary to file a 1095-B with your taxes. 

  Form 1095-C

Form 1095-C

1095-C Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage

Employees will receive a 1095-C if you health care was sponsored by your employer.  

Want more details? The IRS has detailed information about the 1095 forms here.

 

Two More Tax Forms

You may also need to reconcile your tax credits with Form 8962 or claim a health coverage exemption with Form 8965.  (Read about Form 8962 in this blog post!)

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